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Procedures Performed

 

Click on the links below to learn more about these procedures.

EGD/Upper Endoscopy: ERCP Barrx Ablation
Colonoscopy PEG Tube Enteroscopy
Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy PHProbe

 

EGD/Upper Endoscopy

An EGD is an examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract. A small camera attached to a flexible tube is passed through the mouth, down the esophagus into the stomach and first portion of the small intestine. The test takes approximately 5 minutes to complete and you can expect to be in recovery for an additional 20 minutes after the procedure is completed.

 

 

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

A flexible sigmoidoscopy is an examination of the lining of the rectum and the distal part of the colon. Similar to a colonoscopy, a small camera attached to a flexible tube in inserted into the rectum and navigated up to the sigmoid colon, in which the camera is slowly withdrawn. As opposed to a colonoscopy in which the entire colon is visualized, a flexible sigmoidoscopy only examines the distal 1/3 of the colon.

 

 

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy is an examination of the lining of the large intestine/colon. A small camera attached to a flexible tube is inserted into the rectum and navigated around the entire colon (the last three feet of the intestinal tract). The endoscope is then slowly withdrawn looking for pre-cancerous lesions called polyps or other abnormalities. If a polyp or other lesion is found, most of the time it can be safely removed during the exam.. The test takes approximately 20 minutes to complete and you can expect to be in recovery for an additional 20 minutes after the procedure is completed.

 

 

ERCP (Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography)

An ERCP is a specialized procedure performed by your gastroenterologist in which a small fiber optic camera is guided down the esophagus into the proximal small intestine where the biliary and pancreatic systems drain into the intestine. It is used to examine and treat problems in the bile and pancreatic ducts, such as retained gallstones, looking for causes of acute pancreatitis (acute inflammation of the pancreas) and to relieve obstruction of the bile duct caused by tumors such as pancreatic and biliary cancer. For this procedure you will be given IV sedation and the procedure lasts approximately 30-60 minutes. This procedure requires the use of live xray equipment (fluoroscopy) and is therefore done in the hospital setting.

 

 

PEG Tube (Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy)

A percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a specialized procedure performed by your gastroenterologist in which a feeding tube is placed directly into the stomach. It is performed in conjunction with an EGD by first passing a small flexible fiber-optic camera down the esophagus into the stomach. A small incision is then made on the abdomen and the tube is placed. This procedure is used to ensure adequate nutrition to the body when the swallowing mechanism has been damaged in such conditions as acute strokes, head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer, or radiation induced injuries. For this procedure you will be given IV sedation and the procedure lasts approximately 10-15 minutes. Additional therapy with IV antibiotics is also required.

 

PH Probe

It is a simple, comfortable test to detect acid reaching the patient’s airway. The test is performed by using a small tube (about the size of a piece of spaghetti) that has a sensor at the tip. It is placed through the patient’s nose until the sensor is in the back of the patient’s throat. The sensor is high enough so that the patient will not feel it when they talk, eat, drink or swallow. The sensor will collect pH data and send the information to a small recorder worn on the patient’s belt or over their shoulder. This information will help the physician correlate symptoms and any reflux the patient is having. With the information, the physician will be able to differentiate between laryngeal pharyngeal reflux (LPR) and post nasal drip.

 

 

Small Bowel Capsule Endoscopy

Capsule endoscopy is a specialized procedure performed by your gastroenterologist in which a small camera in the shape of a pill (26mm x 11mm) is ingested and tumbles through the gastro-intestinal tract imaging the lining of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon. Pictures are taken at a rate of 2 per second and the images are transmitted to a wireless receiver worn around your belt over an 8 hour time period. The capsule is then passed into the stool and is not retrieved, while the receiver is returned and the images are downloaded to a computer and converted into a video later read by your physician. This exam is used to investigate gastro-intestinal bleeding, anemia, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and unexplained abdominal pain. The exam is performed first thing in the morning and takes 5-10 minutes to complete. The wireless receiver is then returned at the end of the day approximately 8 hours later. No sedation is required for this exam.

 

Enteroscopy

An enteroscopy is a specialized procedure performed by your gastroenterologist in which a small flexible fiber-optic camera is guided down the esophagus deep into the small intestine. It is used to inspect the lining of small intestine not reached with a traditional EGD scope. It is used mainly to treat small intestinal bleeding and to investigate abnormalities seen on xray and during capsule endoscopy. For this procedure you will be given IV sedation and the procedure lasts approximately 30 minutes.

 

Barrx Abalation

Barrx is a specialized procedure performed by your gastroenterologist used in conjunction with an EGD in which a small probe is guided into the esophagus used to treat pre-cancerous lesions of the esophagus called Barrett’s esophagus caused by gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The Barrx probe uses a technology called radio frequency ablation in which a certain frequency of energy is emited from the probe ablating the abnormal tissue while protecting the deeper layers. This procedure is requires special equipment and is therefore performed in the hospital. For this procedure you will be given IV sedation and the procedure lasts approximately 30 minutes.

 

 
 
 
 
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